do not resuscitate tattoo

‘Do Not Resuscitate’ tattoo on unconscious patient’s chest

A man collapsed with ‘Do Not Resuscitate’ tattooed on his chest. Doctors didn’t know what to do. Doctors in Miami faced an unusual ethical dilemma when an unconscious, deteriorating patient was brought into the emergency room with the words “Do Not Resuscitate” across his chest.

What to Do When a Patient Has a ‘Do Not Resuscitate’ Tattoo

What to Do When a Patient Has a ‘Do Not Resuscitate’ Tattoo. The man’s condition deteriorated, and he passed away in the night. The team did the right thing, says Nancy Berlinger from the Hastings …

Do-Not-Resuscitate Tattoos: Are They Valid? – ACEP Now

The “Do Not Resuscitate” tattoo in the article is neither legally nor ethically sufficient to guide medical care for the following reasons: Tattoos are not legal ADs nor POLST, which are the two ACP documents transferrable among institutions in the United States.

Unconscious Patient With ‘Do Not Resuscitate’ Tattoo

But with the “DO NOT RESUSCITATE” tattoo glaring back at them, the ICU team was suddenly confronted with a serious dilemma. The patient arrived at the hospital without ID, the medical staff was unable to contact next of kin, and efforts to revive or communicate with the patient were futile.

His Tattoo Said ‘Do Not Resuscitate.’ Doctors Wanted

Dec 04, 2017 · A man in Miami took extra care to make sure his end-of-life medical treatment went according to his wishes: He had the words “do not resuscitate” tattooed on his chest.

Man’s Unusual ‘Do Not Resuscitate’ Tattoo Sparks Ethics Debate

Man’s Unusual ‘Do Not Resuscitate’ Tattoo Sparks Ethics Debate. “Do not resuscitate” (DNR) is a legal order, which usually requires written paperwork, that prevents doctors from performing cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CRP) or providing advanced life support if …

The Problem with Actually Tattooing DNR across Your Chest

Jul 19, 2012 · The Problem with Actually Tattooing DNR across Your Chest. Emergency responders and clinicians in health care settings are not obligated to respect a DNR tattoo. For a responsive patient, as in the story by Cooper and Aronowitz in this issue of JGIM, 4 a tattoo should provoke a conversation about the patient’s goals, values, and preferences.

Author: Alexander K. Smith, Alexander K. Smith, Bernard Lo